Leonardo Pisano Bigollo, more commonly known as ‘Fibonacci’, was an Italian mathematician who brought an interesting sequence of numbers from the Far East back to Europe. You’re probably already familiar with this unusual string of numbers – the ‘Fibonacci Sequence’- but you might not know that it can be used as a roulette system.

The Fibonacci sequence begins 0, 1 and then continues by adding the last two digits in the sequences. Here are the first ten numbers: 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34.

This is because 0 + 1 = 1; 1 + 1 = 2; 1 + 2 = 3; 2 + 3 = 5; and so on.

A roulette system has been devised that employs this string of numbers and involves betting on the even money propositions; simply move along the Fibonacci sequence with each losing wager and when you eventually win, move back two steps in the string.

So let’s begin with $1 on black. Let’s say that we lose four times in a row and then win three times in a row. Our betting pattern would look like this:

Spin

Outcome

Bet Size

Returns

Cumulative Profit/Loss

1

Loss

$1

$0

$1

2

Loss

$1

$0

$2

3

Loss

$2

$0

$4

4

Loss

$3

$0

$7

5

Win

$5

$10

-$2

6

Win

$2

$4

$0

7

Win

$1

$2

$1

The Pros

Unlike the Martingale system, we didn’t recover all of our losses after our first success, but equally, our bet size hasn’t spiralled out of control (we would have had to bet $16 on spin 5 using Martingale, instead of just $5 using Fibonacci) – this is a major positive to the Fibonacci roulette system.

Furthermore, you’ll notice that we won just 3 out 7 bets – less than half of the time on what is essentially a 50/50 bet – and yet we emerged with profit.

The Cons

Although nowhere near as risky as the Martingale system, the Fibonacci betting strategy is still susceptible to long losing runs.

The major problem with this particular roulette system though, is keeping track of where you are in the sequence. It can be tough to do in your head in the heat of the moment, so it perhaps best employed using an online casino. Be sure to have a pen and paper to hand.

Read More

The Fibonacci Sequence on Wikipedia